Artist Creates Stunning Portraits Just By Smashing Glass

Simon Berger’s innovative and meticulous style of art has drawn many an amazed vistor to his exhibition in Basel, Switzerland.

Many artists are out there looking to find more and more ways to express their thoughts onto a material substance. Only a few, however, take it to a whole new level. Take artist Simon Berger from Switzerland, who has taken to using his good two hands in deconstructing material substances to create fine art. And what is his preferred material? Glass.

Yes, it’s a lot like sculpting, but only much more precise and dangerous. People who’ve worked with glass using a hammer and a chisel might affirm to that. Also, it’s mostly done on flat, long and thick glass panes, rather than blocks. Carving these kinds of glass portraits is no easy feat, but Simon here, through his meticulous and innovative style has brought about a whole new perception of ‘smashing glass’ in certain places.

“Glass is a material that has so much potential in art,” Berger told Bored Panda in an interview. “[Using my workmanship experience,] I have found a technique which is probably the most unique in the [entire] world.” Simon’s amazing and unique expressions went on public display in a very successful exhibition at Philip Brogli’s gallery Artstübli in Basel, Switzerland.

 

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Some would argue that art can only emerge from the destruction of the familiar. For the Swiss artist Simon Berger this is certainly true. He destroys everyday objects such as pianos, calculating machines or currently glass panes in order to create something new with them. Some of his glass portraits are currently exhibited in a gallery in Basel. In order to recognize the art, you often have to look closely.⠀ •⠀ •⠀ •⠀ •⠀ •⠀ #euromaxx #dw_euromaxx #deutschewelle #dw⠀ #art #artist #artwork #kunst #künstler #kunstwerk #arte #artista #operadarte #artexhibition #kunstausstellung #expositiondart #pierrealainmünger #pamcrash #crashart #simonberger #faces ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

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Simon has let his talents as an urban artist develop further into the painting of faces. Re-used materials such as wood, sheet metal parts, glass and more are now the supporting elements for his new works. Through their own expressive possibilities, human faces are developed into portraits, influenced by an in-depth engagement with the base materials as a creative medium.

Oh, and did we mention he also conducts workshops at the venue too! Those interested can drop a message to him requesting for more details.

You might even call Simon a professional glass carpenter for that matter. His expressions and creative ideas are definitely on the artistic side though, rather than the technical aspect of most woodwork designs. Simon has also experimented with materials other than glass. He once created a portrait from an upcycled calculator, showing us that even the most negligible ‘waste’ material can be turned into something special.

 

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#baselswitzerland #gallery #streetart #artstübli #artstuebli #glass #metal #sculpture #simonberger #drsimonfaces

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Simon begins his work by carefully examining the photo of the model he’s required to craft. He sketches the outlines of the figure onto a panel of glass (no paper business here) and marks spots that he wants to avoid removing from the final piece. After a few master strokes and edits, he goes on to carefully chisel away the glass.

According to Simon, the best glass to use for these sort of projects are the hardest kind, that doesn’t break immediately upon the initial impacts, like a car’s windshield.

“Human faces have always fascinated me,” the artist said. “On safety glass, these motifs come into their own and magically attract visitors. It is a discovery from abstract fogging to figurative perception.”

Lovely bit of work here Simon! You might just start inspiring more of here to try out something new and unorthodox ourselves.

Source:BoredPanda
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